Why should you care about PFOA’s and C8?

You lock your doors, tuck your children into bed and do everything you can to make sure they are safe. Then they ask you for a glass of water before they fall asleep. You give them a glass of tap water and kiss them good night. Meanwhile, the chemical companies are dumping PFOA's into the ground. The military bases are hosing down AFFF until it seeps into the ground. These chemicals degrade into C8 and make it into your water supply. They may be in that glass of water you just gave your child.

We are here to help!
Edward Harrington Heyburn, Esq.
(609) 240-5579
heyburn@heyburnlaw.com

Parkersburg, West Virginia

“Eight companies are responsible for C8 contamination in the U.S. (In addition to DuPont, the leader by far in terms of both use and emissions, seven others had a role, including 3M, which produced C8 and sold it to DuPont for years.) ” Sharon Lerner, “The Teflon Toxin-DuPont and the Chemistry of Deception” The Intercept, Aug. 11 2015.  DuPont has approximately 3,500 personal injury cases pending against it for illnesses and diseases cause by C8 exposure throughout West Virginia and Ohio.  Late last year DuPont tried the first of these cases. An Ohion jury in Federal Court awarded the Plaintiff a $1.6 Million judgment.  DuPont quickly settled the second case scheduled for trial.



 

 

“Because of its toxicity, C8 disposal presented a problem. In the early 1960s, the company buried about 200 drums of the chemical on the banks of the Ohio River near the plant. An internal DuPont document from 1975 about “Teflon Waste Disposal” detailed how the company began packing the waste in drums, shipping the drums on barges out to sea, and dumping them into the ocean, adding stones to make the drums sink. Though the practice resulted in a moment of unfavorable publicity when a fisherman caught one of the drums in his net, no one outside the company realized the danger the chemical presented. At some point before 1965, ocean dumping ceased, and DuPont began disposing of its Teflon waste in landfills instead.” Lerner.

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